Want more resilience? Physician coaching helps you find the strength in holding opposites

Lengthening and stretching the body is one goal of yoga practice.  As you stretch your arms up toward the sky, you also imagine pushing your legs down into the Silhouette of a beautiful Yoga womanearth.  We are definitely not used to this habit of moving in two different directions at once.  In fact, we are encouraged from an early age to decide on one path and move in that direction only.  Young athletes are advised to concentrate on one sport, lest their potential competitors improve and leave them behind.  As medical students, we are encouraged to decide on a specialty early in our training, so we can do research and add clinical experience to our CV and thus appear to be a more dedicated applicant for residency.  We expect our politicians to be sure of their positions and uni-dimensional in their stances on issues or we judge them to be “wishy-washy” or not committed to the cause.  By not allowing ourselves to stretch into other directions, we contract and weaken.  We don’t learn to appreciate, engage and benefit from the full range of our capabilities. We fail to develop the trust and confidence in ourselves that only comes from knowing how far we can stretch.  Ask any yogi and they will tell you how much space and strength develop when we learn to grow in opposite directions.

When we deny ourselves the experience of exploring other options, opinions, or activities, we also prevent ourselves from developing the resilience that’s necessary to adapt and adjust to what life brings. Instead of being resilient, we become brittle.  The truth is that we are all much more complex and colorful than the uni-dimensional version we allow the world to see.  To maintain this facade, we often need to neglect important parts of ourselves.  We become disconnected from all that we are, and that disconnection leads to burnout.

David Richo’s Practice of Befriending the Shadow offers a method for stretching our minds and spirits, much like yoga stretches our bodies.  Richo asks if we can be “committed in a relationship while still remaining free,” “angry at someone while still remaining loving toward this person,” ” aware of my faults while still remaining high in self esteem,” “responsibly in control of myself while still remaining spontaneous,” “flexible while still remaining true to my standards.” Many of us may wonder if this is possible; we may even feel an instant resistance to this idea.  All too often, we fall into an “either/or” or “all or none” stance that forces us to turn our backs on an entire side of our personality or option for our life.  We are unable to forgive a person for their mistake and lose valuable friendships.  One error causes us to lose our self-esteem and self-confidence. Our lives become more stressful as we fear that one spontaneous act or relaxation of our rules may call our character into question.

We can challenge our habit of closing ourselves off and, instead, intentionally begin to stretch ourselves.  What’s something you’ve wanted to do, but told yourself you can’t because it wouldn’t be in keeping with the persona you let the world see?     Would you be willing to discuss an issue you feel strongly about with someone who holds the opposite opinion, bringing an open mind and honestly hoping to discover something you might agree with?  Is there someone who has angered you, with whom you might have a conversation to hear their side of the story?  Have you doubted your ability because you’re not perfect? What do you know about your capabilities and successes that you might employ as a counterbalance?

By making a conscious effort to look at the other side – to stretch ourselves in both directions – we make more space in our lives, become more resilient, and strengthen our ability to live full and rich lives.

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Announcing the True Story Group Coaching Program for Women Physicians!

Women physicians are a unique group.  We’re smart, caring and talented.  Many of us wonder why we’re not as happy as we thought we’d be.  We used our intellect to succeed in a challenging course of study, only to find ourselves in a career that is fraught with biases that limit our opportunities, work that doesn’t stimulate us, and demands that leave little time or energy for the excitement and promise we imagined life would hold.  In our dreams, we were helping people, making a difference, and living with passion. Now, we wonder why the life we lead has so little joy. We try to solve this dilemma with the same skills that allowed us to succeed in school – hard work, perseverance, ignoring our desires and needs.  When this doesn’t work, we feel confused and stuck.

What if you could unlock this mystery and find greater freedom in your life in the next
six months?

Portrait of happy traveler girl with raised up handsThis is why I designed the True Story Physician Coaching Program.  Based on the transformational Break Through to your Great Story program developed by Lucid Living, this new, four-month virtual program is designed specifically for women who want more joy in their life as a physician.  Women who are ready to discard old beliefs that have prevented them from living the life they dreamed of.  Women who are willing to look at the ways in which they have kept themselves trapped in repeating cycles of despair and overwork by telling themselves that “this is just the way things are.”  Women who yearn to create a new story – a story that reflects what is true about their desires, talents, and strengths – and realize their dream of living authentically, with passion and joy.

Designed for busy women physicians, the program includes a preliminary, individual strategy session with me to define your personal goals for the program, eight, 75-minute live group phone calls and two, 60-minute individual coaching sessions.  There will be homework between sessions to aid you in applying what you’re learning to your own life, and a private online group for you to share your insights and receive support from the group in between sessions.  While your time investment will likely be around 5-6 hours/ month, the skills and perspectives you gain may save you countless hours in the future!

To sign up or learn more, email helanefronekmd@gmail.com.  And feel free to forward this to any woman physician who might be interested!

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Welcome, 2019! Your Year in Review

Having lived in the same city for 36 years, I tend to shop at the same places, eat out at the same places, see the same people.  I’m generally happy with that, or I would probably change my habits.  And yet, as we look forward to a new year, most of us hope it will Silhouette freedom young woman Enjoying on the hill and 2019 years while celebrating new year, copy spce.be…happier, healthier, more productive, more prosperous, more fun, filled with more time with the people we love.  Chances are, without an intentional and deliberate approach, 2019 will be a lot like 2018.

When we think about having “more” of something, we need to know our starting point.  What made us happy and where was happiness missing?  In what ways do we feel unhealthy now?  What opportunities exist for us to become more productive or prosperous?  What was fun and in what ways can we fill 2019 with more of that? Who are the important people in our lives and how can we connect more?

I offer this Year in Review as a structure for you to take stock of your experience of 2018. Each question will prompt you to discover something important about the year you’ve lived and encourage you to create a vision and goals for the year ahead.  Each of us has the opportunity to make 2019 MORE of everything we want.  It just requires our attention, creativity, and commitment.

  1. Whom did I meet this year that is now in my life?   What do I value about this relationship?  If I’ve learned something significant from this person, how can I put it to use in other areas of my life?  In what ways do I want to develop this relationship in the coming year?
  2. How did I honor myself by attending to my mental, physical and spiritual health?  How might I make my own health a priority in 2019?
  3. What did I do that completely surprised me?  What allowed me to do this? As we know ourselves better, we become more confident and are able to use our talents in more intentional and productive ways.  Since you surprised yourself by doing this (and are obviously more capable than you thought!), what else might you want to do?
  4. What is the biggest challenge I faced?  What was difficult about this?  What internal and external supports helped me overcome this challenge?  How might I put these supports to use with other challenges I’m facing?
  5. In what area(s) of my life did I make progress?  What’s the next step I want to take with this?
  6. What am I still tolerating?  What do I want to do about that?
  7. Whom did I help?  What talents and skills did I use? Where else might they be of service?
  8. What am I most grateful for?  How might I show my appreciation or experience more of this in the coming year?
  9. What were the most fun times I had? How can I have more fun in 2019?
  10. In what ways do I want the coming year to be the same?  How do I want it to be different? What is the first step I can take toward that end?

With my warmest wishes for a year of authentically being you – bringing your desires, passions, and gifts to every area of your life.  The world is in need of everything you can offer.  And in this way, 2019 will be filled with more of everything you want.

Helane

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I am here. I am seen. Let 2019 be the year of authenticity, encourages a physician coach.

As I sit in our Cape Town hotel, I’m reminded of a story in The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook, where Peter Senge describes a South African tribe whose members greet each other not with, “Hello,” but by saying, “I see you.” In response to this is, the other person replies, “I am here.”  There’s a lot of substance in this interaction.

Most people yearn to be seen and to be here, living their life fully and authentically.

Searching for the right one Magnifying glass focusing on red manI can offer innumerable examples of people NOT being seen.  Physicians who aren’t valued for their excellent patient care because they are viewed as less productive than some of their peers.  Budding leaders who are passed over because those in leadership positions don’t take the time to notice their skills and desire to contribute.  Even our daughter’s basketball coach, who never appreciated which players were best at guarding, dribbling or sinking 3-point shots and let the talents of the girls go unutilized.  It’s frustrating to not have people recognize what we have to offer – to not “see” us.  It makes us doubt our own value.  We wonder if we’re not seen because there’s nothing remarkable to see.

But being seen is just half of the equation.  What about the part when we say, “I am here?”  The part when we show up authentically and contribute in meaningful ways.

Much has been written about what holds us back from bursting out as the full version of ourselves.  We fear we won’t be good enough or won’t be accepted.  We secretly believe we’ve managed to fool people by hiding who we are and that, if they discover what’s lurking behind the facade we present to the world, they won’t like or respect us.  The truth is, as Dr. Seuss so aptly advised,  “Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don’t matter and those who matter don’t mind.”

I’ve written before about my beloved cousin, who stayed hidden for decades.  Now living as the transgender woman she is, she is a dynamic and positive force in her community, bringing people together to support important causes.  While there have been difficulties in her transition, the aliveness with which she now lives is inspiring and she has found acceptance and a sense of purpose that eluded her for many years.  Until she decided to allow herself to be known, no one could actually “see” her. The “catch-22” is that, while we desperately want people to see and accept us, when we pretend to be someone we’re not, we never allow that to happen.  We distrust any acceptance we receive because we secretly know that it is not our true self who is being accepted.

The new year offers us a natural point in time to consider how we want our life to be different.  As we prepare to usher in 2019, what aspect of yourself do you really want people to recognize?  How can you let people know what you have to offer?  In what way can you “be here” so that others can “see” the real you?   Only by showing up as our authentic self can we bring our gifts to the world, connect with others and be accepted.  Imagine how exciting 2019 will be if we each commit to living like that.

To be here.  And to be seen.

 

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The best indulgence on Thanksgiving

Gratitude and Awe – why do we deprive ourselves of them?

ThanksgivingDay.jpg
Fortunately, along comes Thanksgiving, the holiday that prompts us to “give thanks.”  Sure, the day is already full with cooking, eating, football, and all sorts of family traditions.  But let’s leave a bit of time for the act of recognizing and allowing our feelings of gratitude and awe.

Both emotions can help us interrupt our busyness and become present, rather than remaining trapped in our usual cycle of fretting about some imagined future or feeling bad about something in the past.  They call us to recognize what is joyful and fulfilling in our lives and allow us to appreciate that we are part of something grander and more meaningful than our anxieties and fears.

Psychology Today tells us that gratitude increases our energy, optimism, and empathy. Experiencing gratitude raises our levels of serotonin and dopamine so we feel happier and more motivated.  Looking at what is going well in our lives gives us confidence and ideas to meet our current challenges.  In fact, we change the entire experience of our lives when we shift our attention from focusing on our problems to appreciating the positive aspects of our lives.  Awe helps us recognize that we’re part of something bigger and we become more collaborative, as our thinking shifts from “me to we.”  As we stop and take in something we didn’t see before, we begin to see other things anew as well.  Awe even makes us happier and kinder.

What are you grateful for in this moment?

As you stop and look around, what stands out for its beauty or mystery?

We can make tomorrow a true day of giving thanks by stopping – hourly, or even once, when we’re seated around the table or wherever we find ourselves – and asking what we feel grateful for and what inspires us at that moment.  The gratitude and awe we experience will fill our soul and bring joy into our lives in ways that the most delicious turkey, stuffing, or pumpkin pie can never do.

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4 powerful ways you can thrive during medical training, career, and life. A physician coach shares perspectives and practices

At the recent American Medical Women’s Association meeting, I had the chance to speak with medical students and residents about ways in which they might thrive during the grueling years of training.  “How many of you have a sense of freedom in your lives right now?” I asked.  Not one person raised her hand.  Instead, they described their lives as stressful and overscheduled.  I’m sure many of us – in medicine and outside of this profession – feel the same way.  Here’s a link to the article on Doximity with ideas to help you thrive during training and beyond!

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Don’t “get over it…get UNDER it” Physician coaching helps us find the security in complexity

Often, when we’re troubled by something, we’re given the well-meaning advice to “get over it.”  “I’ve moved on,” we might say to ourselves or others, hoping we can ignore the uncomfortable feelings we’re having and get on with our lives.  But the truth is that when something troubles us, there’s often a good reason.  When we “get over it” without exploring what’s “under” it, we disrespect ourselves.  We act as though our feelings, beliefs, and values don’t matter.

FogAs a San Diegan for 35 years, I’ve grown accustomed to dense fog along the coast that obscures what I know to be a scenic vista.   Beyond this fog, I know there is a panoramic view of the Pacific Ocean.  Once the fog dissipates, I can see the complexity of nature – the beautiful though eroding coastline, marine life, the ebb and flow of the waves – that inspires me every time. Similarly, when we try to “get over” our emotions, we deprive ourselves of an understanding of the complexity of the world and our experience of it.

After the events in Charlottesville, I was unable to sleep, full of anxiety and fear that the hatred being expressed in Virginia could not be contained or transmuted.  Rather than try to “get over it,” I decided to see what was under it.  The first thing I found was anger that the world wasn’t a simple place where everyone could be happy, as I wanted them to be.  Growing up in a family where negative emotions weren’t allowed, I had become very uncomfortable with them.  I wanted the world to be a happy place, where I could remain in my emotional comfort zone.

As the hours passed and I explored an even greater complexity – the feeling of being powerless – my anxiety dissipated, just like the fog.  While no resolution was reached in those early hours of the morning, I could see the issues more clearly.  And in that greater vision grew a confidence that, while the violent expression of hatred wasn’t acceptable, resolution would only occur if both sides could understand their own feelings and desires, and be heard. The following month, I had an opportunity to put my newfound understanding into action.  A fellow gym-goer began a diatribe filled with hurtful, overtly racist comments.  Previously, I would have moved into the other room to avoid an uncomfortable confrontation.  Understanding that this was about my feeling powerless and an unwillingness to empathize with others, I instead began a conversation.  While I can’t claim that we changed each others’ beliefs, it felt both more powerful and hopeful to me to speak up than to cower and hope these opinions would simply disappear from our public sphere if I ignored them.

So the next time strong emotions are triggered by an event, comment, or action, take a few moments and consider what’s under them.  What’s the emotion you’re feeling?  What beliefs are fueling the emotion?  What more complex truth can you see in the situation?  By holding that complexity, see if you don’t feel greater security in a deeper understanding of the situation and the value you hold that feels imperiled.  Once the fog dissipates and we see things more clearly, it’s usually easier to bridge gaps and find solutions.  But first, we have to be willing to look under our emotions, rather than just getting over them.

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